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Idaho State Museum to recognize 80th anniversary of internment of Japanese Americans with Boise-based events

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The Heart Mountain Relocation Center in Park County, Wyoming, was one of 10 internment camps for Japanese Americans evicted from their homes during World War II. They were removed by Executive Order 9066, signed by President Franklin Roosevelt after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. This had been an irrigation project site, but construction of 650 military-style barracks and surrounding guard towers began in June 1942, and the camp opened on Aug. 11 of that year. (Courtesy of Carol Highsmith/Library of Congress)

The Idaho State Museum will recognize the 80th anniversary of Executive Order 9066, the presidential order that authorized and set in motion the forced removal and mass incarceration of more than 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II, with a film screening and panel discussion open to the public.

The museum is partnering with the Minidoka National Historic Site, Friends of Minidoka, Boise Valley Japanese American Citizens League, Boise State University and the ACLU of Idaho to mark the anniversary on Feb. 21, according to a press release.

Minidoka, located in south-central Idaho, was one of 10 concentration camps across the country where Japanese Americans from the West Coast were incarcerated.

Events planned include a film screening of Alternative Facts: The Lies of Executive Order 9066” and a panel discussion. The one-hour film screening begins at 2:30 p.m. and will be followed by a panel discussion at the Idaho State Museum. Panelists include Jon Osaki, filmmaker; Leo Morales, executive director of the ACLU of Idaho; and Ronald E. Bush, retired magistrate judge of the U.S. District Court for the District of Idaho.

Hosted by the Boise Valley Japanese American Citizens League, Gov. Brad Little will sign a proclamation before the film screening at the Idaho State Capitol. Idaho has the longest-running Statehouse Day of Remembrance ceremony in the nation, according to the press release. Due to limited space, the proclamation signing will not be open to the public.

For information, go to https://history.idaho.gov/event/day-of-remembrance/.